Tag Archives: Ron Rolheiser

Fr. Rolheiser on Our Lord’s Epiphany

The Epiphany of Our Lord
The Epiphany of Our Lord

I love this last paragraph from Father Ron Rolheiser’s reflection on this Sunday’s Gospel (The Epiphany of Our Lord):

To bless another person is to give away some of one’s own life so that the other might be more resourced for his or her journey. Good parents do that for their children. Good teachers do that for their students, good mentors do that for their protégés, good pastors do that for their parishioners, good politicians do that for their countries, and good elders do that for the young. They give away some of their own lives to resource the other. The wise men did that for Jesus.

How do we react when a young star’s rising begins to eclipse our own light?

If you have the time, I highly recommend reading the whole article.

Have you ever wondered what ever happened to the Three Wise Men?  According to Fr. Rolheiser, while there are myths, the fact that there is no real historical proof is part of their gift.  Jesus was the Star.  So the three kings, who were probably stars in their own right, were able to exit the stage:

The wise men follow the star, find the new king, and, upon seeing him, place their gifts at his feet. What happens to them afterwards? We have all kinds of apocryphal stories about their journey back home, but these, while interesting, are not helpful. We do not know what happened to them afterwards and that is exactly the point. Their slipping away into anonymity is a crucial part of their gift. The idea is that they now disappear because they can now disappear. They have placed their gifts at the feet of the young king and can now leave everything safely in his hands. His star has eclipsed theirs. Far from fighting for their former place, they now happily cede it to him. Like old Simeon, they can happily exit the stage singing: Now, Lord, you can dismiss your servants! We can die! We’re in safe hands!

You should read his bio here, and while I was there myself, I picked up this wonderful passage from one of his old columns:

All of us live our lives in exile. We live in our separate riddles, partially separated from God, each other, and even from ourselves. We experience some love, some community, some peace, but never these in their fullness. Our senses, egocentricity, and human nature place a veil between us and full love, full community, and full peace. We live, truly, as in a riddle: The God who is omnipresent cannot be sensed; others, who are as real as ourselves, are always partially distanced and unreal; and we are, in the end, fundamentally a mystery even to ourselves.

Isn’t that beautiful?  He articulated what I felt while going home on the subway this past Tuesday.

God bless Father Rolheiser.  May his wisdom set other souls on fire.